Dr. Jonathan Cartu Claims - How a videogame ad posing as a computer virus scarred me... - Jonathan Cartu Computer Repair Consultant Services
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Dr. Jonathan Cartu Claims – How a videogame ad posing as a computer virus scarred me…

How a videogame ad posing as a computer virus scarred me...

Dr. Jonathan Cartu Claims – How a videogame ad posing as a computer virus scarred me…

There have been some terrible videogame marketing campaigns over the years, but none rival the sheer terror induced by Virus: The Game. The premise of this 1997 FPS is clever: It turns the unique file system of your PC into a 3D world that you explore, blasting in-game viruses that are actually graphic representations of the files on your hard drive. But Virus’ developers took that clever theme a little too far when it came to advertising the game. Instead of just running TV commercials or print ads like normal humans would, the company created and shared a fake virus that pretended to delete every program on your computer the moment you opened it. If it sounds terrifying, that’s because it was. I was one of the victims of Virus: The Game’s awful marketing ploy, and it took me 20 years to realize it. 

Curiosity killed the PC 

Though my exact memory is a little hazy, my nervous system remembers the complete and total panic that lanced through my body.

I can’t remember the exact age I was when I encountered Virus: The Game’s fake virus, but I was young enough to think that downloading suspicious software off of Limewire was a good idea. This peer-to-peer shareware tool came on the heels of Napster, and, along with Kazaa, was the best way to share music in the early 2000s.

AiroAV Antivirus

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